hidden Bottoms Up: New Consensus Recommendations Highlight Best Beverages For Young Children’s Health

Bottoms Up: New Consensus Recommendations Highlight Best Beverages For Young Children’s Health

Authors: Stephen R. Daniels, M.D., Ph.D., Professor and Chair, Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado School of Medicine; Pediatrician-in-Chief, Children’s Hospital Colorado; Emily A. Callahan, M.P.H., R.D.N., Owner, EAC Health and Nutrition, LLC

Preview: When it comes to beverages for children from birth through age 5, keep it plain and simple – breast milk or infant formula, water, and plain milk are best.

hidden New Data Helps Measure, Map Poverty’s Connection With Heart Failure Deaths

New Data Helps Measure, Map Poverty’s Connection With Heart Failure Deaths

Authors: Mariell Jessup, M.D., FAHA; Chief Science and Medical Officer, American Heart Association; Kim Stitzel, M.S., R.D.; Senior Vice President, Center for Health Metrics and Evaluation, American Heart Association

Preview: Poverty level is a county’s strongest socioeconomic factor associated with dying from heart failure and coronary heart disease, according to new research in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

hidden Increased Heart Disease Risk Among Childhood Cancer Survivors Highlights Need To Focus On Healthy Lifestyles

Increased Heart Disease Risk Among Childhood Cancer Survivors Highlights Need To Focus On Healthy Lifestyles

Author: Sarah de Ferranti, M.D., M.P.H., Chief, Division of Cardiology Outpatient Services and Director, Preventive Cardiology, Boston Children’s Hospital; Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School

Preview: Childhood cancer survivors face an increased risk of heart disease compared to people without cancer, according to a study published today in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

hidden Rejected Or Abandoned Cholesterol Drug Prescriptions Tied To More Heart Events

Rejected Or Abandoned Cholesterol Drug Prescriptions Tied To More Heart Events

Author: Donald M. Lloyd-Jones, M.D., Sc.M., FACC, FAHA, Senior Associate Dean for Clinical and Translational Research and Chair of the Department of Medicine, Northwestern University

Preview: People whose cholesterol-lowering drug prescriptions are rejected or abandoned are more likely to have heart events than those whose prescriptions are covered. That’s the finding of a study published today in the American Heart Association journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

hidden Unexpected Finding: Army Personnel Less Likely Than Civilians to Have Ideal Heart Health

Unexpected Finding: Army Personnel Less Likely Than Civilians to Have Ideal Heart Health

Authors: Alice Shrestha, University of Pennsylvania; Tiffany E. Ho, University of Pennsylvania; Loryana Vie, University of Pennsylvania; Darwin R. Labarthe, Northwestern University; Lawrence M. Scheier, University of Pennsylvania; Paul B. Lester, Army Research Facilitation Laboratory; and Martin E.P. Seligman, University of Pennsylvania

Preview: Army personnel are less likely than civilians to have ideal heart health — even when excluding the least healthy members, according to a first-of-its kind study.

hidden Tracking Efforts to Move More and Sit Less: All Hands on Deck

Tracking Efforts to Move More and Sit Less: All Hands on Deck

Author: Laurie Whitsel, PhD, Vice President of Policy Research and Translation, American Heart Association

Preview: Given the compelling data on physical activity’s impressive contributions to health, it’s even more critical that public health efforts support our population in moving more and sitting less.

hidden Workplace Health Needs More Rigorous Evaluation of Comprehensive Programs

Workplace Health Needs More Rigorous Evaluation of Comprehensive Programs

Authors: Eduardo Sanchez, M.D., M.P.H., Chief, Center for Health Metrics and Evaluation; Chris Calitz, M.P.P, Director, Center for Workplace Health

Preview: A worksite wellness study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) on April 16, 2019, and a corresponding New York Times article headlined “Employee Wellness Programs Yield Little Benefit, Study Shows” appeared to question the effectiveness of workplace health promotion programs..

hidden New Data: Intensive Blood Pressure Control In Adults With Type 2 Diabetes Can Save Lives

New Data: Intensive Blood Pressure Control In Adults With Type 2 Diabetes Can Save Lives

Author: Eduardo Sanchez, M.D., M.P.H., Chief Medical Officer for Prevention and Chief of the Center for Health Metrics and Evaluation, American Heart Association

Preview: Intensive blood pressure treatment is good for adults with type 2 diabetes, regardless of their baseline blood pressure or cardiovascular risk. That’s the promising finding of a new study published today in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension.