hidden Increased Heart Disease Risk Among Childhood Cancer Survivors Highlights Need To Focus On Healthy Lifestyles

Increased Heart Disease Risk Among Childhood Cancer Survivors Highlights Need To Focus On Healthy Lifestyles

Author: Sarah de Ferranti, M.D., M.P.H., Chief, Division of Cardiology Outpatient Services and Director, Preventive Cardiology, Boston Children’s Hospital; Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School

Preview: Childhood cancer survivors face an increased risk of heart disease compared to people without cancer, according to a study published today in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

hidden Unexpected Finding: Army Personnel Less Likely Than Civilians to Have Ideal Heart Health

Unexpected Finding: Army Personnel Less Likely Than Civilians to Have Ideal Heart Health

Authors: Alice Shrestha, University of Pennsylvania; Tiffany E. Ho, University of Pennsylvania; Loryana Vie, University of Pennsylvania; Darwin R. Labarthe, Northwestern University; Lawrence M. Scheier, University of Pennsylvania; Paul B. Lester, Army Research Facilitation Laboratory; and Martin E.P. Seligman, University of Pennsylvania

Preview: Army personnel are less likely than civilians to have ideal heart health — even when excluding the least healthy members, according to a first-of-its kind study.

hidden New Data: Intensive Blood Pressure Control In Adults With Type 2 Diabetes Can Save Lives

New Data: Intensive Blood Pressure Control In Adults With Type 2 Diabetes Can Save Lives

Author: Eduardo Sanchez, M.D., M.P.H., Chief Medical Officer for Prevention and Chief of the Center for Health Metrics and Evaluation, American Heart Association

Preview: Intensive blood pressure treatment is good for adults with type 2 diabetes, regardless of their baseline blood pressure or cardiovascular risk. That’s the promising finding of a new study published today in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension.

hidden What You Need to Know About the New Prevention Guidelines

What You Need to Know About the New Prevention Guidelines

Author: Penny M. Kris-Etherton, Distinguished Professor of Nutrition, The Pennsylvania State University, Ph.D., R.D.N., L.D.N., FAHA, FNLA, FASN, CLS

Preview: The most important way to prevent cardiovascular disease is through a healthy lifestyle throughout life. That’s a key message of new guidelines on the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, released today by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology.

hidden Have Faith: Community-Based Interventions Can Reduce Blood Pressure in African-Americans

Have Faith: Community-Based Interventions Can Reduce Blood Pressure in African-Americans

Author: Ivor J. Benjamin, M.D., FAHA, FACC, President, American Heart Association, 2017-18; Professor of Medicine and Director of the Cardiovascular Center at Froedtert Hospital and the Medical College of Wisconsin

Preview: A new study confirms that lay health educators are dependable partners in implementing community-based hypertension control programs.

hidden Four Principles to Help Control the High Cost of High Blood Pressure

Four Principles to Help Control the High Cost of High Blood Pressure

Author: Joey Granger, Ph.D., FAHA; Billy S. Guyton Distinguished Professor, Professor of Physiology and Medicine and Director, Cardiovascular-Renal Research Center, University of Mississippi Medical Center; Chair, American Heart Association Council on Hypertension

Preview: Four Principles to Help Control the High Cost of High Blood Pressure

hidden Prevention Is Worth It

Prevention Is Worth It

Author: Eduardo Sanchez, M.D., M.P.H., Chief Medical Officer for Prevention and Chief of the Center for Health Metrics and Evaluation, American Heart Association

Preview: A better headline would have been “Preventive Care; Sometimes Good Things Cost Money.”

hidden Supporting the Complex Health Needs of Americans With Multiple Chronic Conditions

Supporting the Complex Health Needs of Americans With Multiple Chronic Conditions

Author: Eduardo Sanchez, M.D., M.P.H., Chief Medical Officer for Prevention and Chief of the Center for Health Metrics and Evaluation, American Heart Association

Preview: It is challenging enough to live with a chronic disease like hypertension, but having multiple chronic conditions is even more difficult. Yet this is a reality for the roughly 1 in 4 adults in the United States who have two or more concurrent chronic conditions.