hidden Bottoms Up: New Consensus Recommendations Highlight Best Beverages For Young Children’s Health

Bottoms Up: New Consensus Recommendations Highlight Best Beverages For Young Children’s Health

Authors: Stephen R. Daniels, M.D., Ph.D., Professor and Chair, Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado School of Medicine; Pediatrician-in-Chief, Children’s Hospital Colorado; Emily A. Callahan, M.P.H., R.D.N., Owner, EAC Health and Nutrition, LLC

Preview: When it comes to beverages for children from birth through age 5, keep it plain and simple – breast milk or infant formula, water, and plain milk are best.

hidden Generating Evidence to Support Health Promotion Policies: Added Sugar Labeling

Generating Evidence to Support Health Promotion Policies: Added Sugar Labeling

Authors: Dariush Mozaffarian, M.D., Dr.P.H., FAHA, Dean and Jean Mayer Professor, Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy; Professor of Medicine, Tufts Medical School; Renata Micha, R.D., Ph.D., Research Associate Professor, Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy

Preview: The mandatory labeling of added sugar content on packaged foods and beverages in the United States could generate substantial health gains and cost savings, based on a study that we published today in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

hidden What You Need to Know About the New Prevention Guidelines

What You Need to Know About the New Prevention Guidelines

Author: Penny M. Kris-Etherton, Distinguished Professor of Nutrition, The Pennsylvania State University, Ph.D., R.D.N., L.D.N., FAHA, FNLA, FASN, CLS

Preview: The most important way to prevent cardiovascular disease is through a healthy lifestyle throughout life. That’s a key message of new guidelines on the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, released today by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology.

hidden CDC Report Reaffirms Importance of Eating More Fruits And Vegetables

CDC Report Reaffirms Importance of Eating More Fruits And Vegetables

Author: Eduardo Sanchez, M.D., M.P.H., Chief Medical Officer for Prevention and Chief of the Center for Health Metrics and Evaluation, and Kim Stitzel, M.S., R.D., Senior Vice President, Center for Health Metrics and Evaluation

Preview: Eat your fruits and vegetables. The public health community and our mothers have been making this simple recommendation for people to improve their health for decades, and it’s just as true today.

hidden For Rural U.S. Residents, More Is Often Less When It Comes to Health

For Rural U.S. Residents, More Is Often Less When It Comes to Health

Getting all Americans healthy — regardless of their race/ethnicity, income, education or geography — is a lofty goal. But our attention, our resources and, most importantly, our actions are needed now more than ever. Although obesity has historically hit upper socioeconomic classes obesity harder, that reality has changed. The previous effects of poverty — including