hidden Community supports for physical activity: Why and how to keep track of them

Community supports for physical activity: Why and how to keep track of them

Author: James F. Sallis, Ph.D., Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California San Diego; Daniel A. Rodriguez, Ph.D., Department of City & Regional Planning and Institute for Transportation Studies, University of California, Berkeley

Preview: A useful surveillance system for public health planning must go beyond assessing only physical activity by including measures of modifiable characteristics that can influence the behavior. This system can also reflect the extent of interventions and changes in those characteristics nationwide.

hidden What You Need to Know About the New Prevention Guidelines

What You Need to Know About the New Prevention Guidelines

Author: Penny M. Kris-Etherton, Distinguished Professor of Nutrition, The Pennsylvania State University, Ph.D., R.D.N., L.D.N., FAHA, FNLA, FASN, CLS

Preview: The most important way to prevent cardiovascular disease is through a healthy lifestyle throughout life. That’s a key message of new guidelines on the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, released today by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology.

hidden Updated Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans Provides New Research and Tools for Health Professionals to Support Increased Physical Activity

Updated Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans Provides New Research and Tools for Health Professionals to Support Increased Physical Activity

Author: Alison Vaux-Bjerke, M.P.H., and Katrina L. Piercy, Ph.D., R.D., ACSM-CEP, Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Preview: Physical activity is one of the best things you can do for your health, but few Americans are regularly active enough to meet the federally recommended levels of physical activity. We know that guidance from health professionals works when it comes to increasing physical activity levels.

hidden For Rural U.S. Residents, More Is Often Less When It Comes to Health

For Rural U.S. Residents, More Is Often Less When It Comes to Health

Getting all Americans healthy — regardless of their race/ethnicity, income, education or geography — is a lofty goal. But our attention, our resources and, most importantly, our actions are needed now more than ever. Although obesity has historically hit upper socioeconomic classes obesity harder, that reality has changed. The previous effects of poverty — including